When you’re facing criminal charges, you have several decisions to make early in the case. One of the primary ones is whether you are going to plead guilty or not guilty to the charges against you. Most people opt to plead not guilty so that they have a chance to fight the charges.

For some individuals, the not guilty plea buys them time to find out if they are going to be able to work out a plea deal with the prosecutor. These agreements are typically encouraged by the courts since they help relieve the pressure on the court docket. One thing to remember if you’re interested in trying to work out a plea deal is that there is a good chance that the prosecutor will only work with your attorney. Some might opt not to try to work out deals with defendants who are representing themselves.

When you’re offered a plea deal, you must check the terms carefully. There are several areas that the prosecutor might address. Sometimes, you’ll be offered a reduced charge for you to plead guilty to. This may mean that the sentence you receive isn’t as great. You may have a specific sentence offered in exchange for the plea.

Remember, the court doesn’t have to accept the plea deal. There is a chance that the judge might change the sentence you face a bit.

Entering into a plea deal means that you have to give up your right to appeal. For this reason, you shouldn’t agree to it unless you fully understand the terms and wholly agree to them. If you have any doubts that the plea is the right option for you, allowing your case to head toward trial might be your chosen course of action.