Your recent personal injury in North Carolina may have resulted in you having to use a wheelchair for the foreseeable future. Depending on the severity of the injury, you may have to make modifications to your home to make it easier for you to get around and carry out regular day-to-day tasks.

The Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation provides some insight into common home modifications for those who use wheelchairs. Gain a better understanding of universal design to maximize your comfort and accessibility in your home.

Exits and entrances

Focus on eliminating stairs at all entrances and exits in your residence. You also need to ensure there is plenty of room for you and your wheelchair at exits and entrances. For those times when it snows, rains or hails, having a covered entrance adds a measure of protection and comfort. Speaking of inclement weather, add slip-resistant mats to entrances and exits.

Living room

All light switches in your living room and throughout the rest of your house should be easy to reach, and the same applies to electrical outlets. Take a close look at the current layout of your living room. Do you have enough room to maneuver between and around furniture?

Kitchen

To avoid future injuries, it is best that all countertops in your kitchen have rounded edges. Add space underneath the sink, cooktops and countertops for your wheelchair. A side-by-side freezer and fridge provide easy access, as does a pull-out pantry.

Bathroom

A roll-in shower with an adjustable showerhead makes it easy for you to tend to personal hygiene. Your bathroom is also likely to need grab bars and a toilet that has 20 inches of space around it. Also, pay attention to how close your sink bowl is to the edge of the vanity.

This information is only intended to educate and should not be interpreted as legal advice.